Transcontinental Aerial Navigation Company of Chicago

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It's not clear that the Transcontinental Aerial Navigation Company of Chicago had an existence apart from Arthur de Bausset, or that it outlasted his move to New York City.

One source says the company was "incorporated under the laws of the State of Illinois, February 18, 1886."[1]

En.wp shows:[2]

From 1886 to 1900 Arthur De Bausset attempted in vain to raise funds to construct his "vacuum-tube" airship design, but despite early support in the United States Congress, the general public was skeptical. Illinois historian Howard Scamehorn reported that Octave Chanute and Albert Francis Zahm "publicly denounced and mathematically proved the fallacy of the vacuum principle", however the author does not give his source.[3] De Bausset published a book on his design[4] and offered $150,000 stock in the Transcontinental Aerial Navigation Company of Chicago.[5][6] His patent application was eventually denied on the basis that it was "wholly theoretical, everything being based upon calculation and nothing upon trial or demonstration."[7]


References

  1. Amazon.com page about a reprint of de Baussett's Aerial Navigation, which was published by or under the name of this company.
  2. w:Vacuum airship, as of Aug 2021
  3. Template:Cite book
  4. Template:Cite book
  5. Template:Cite journal
  6. Template:Cite journal
  7. Template:Cite book


Names Transcontinental Aerial Navigation Company of Chicago
Country US
City Chicago
Affiliations
Keywords airship, publisher
Started aero 1886
Ended aero
Key people Arthur de Bausset
Wikidata id